Mochi

March 5, 2012 at 9:33 pm | Posted in Food | 8 Comments
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One of my favorite Japanese desserts is mochi.  If I had to describe it, I guess I would call it a cross between a marshmallow and buttered rice – mildly sweet, slightly sticky, chewy, slight rice flavor, and delicious.  Needless to say I am very happy to have discovered how easy it is to make at home. Image

You only need a few basic ingredients: sugar, water, and rice flour.  Most recipes call for the rice flour to be mochiko – Japanese glutenous rice flour.  My local Albertsons doesn’t carry much in the way of international ingredients, but I was able to find regular rice flour in the gluten free baking section – it works just the same as mochiko.

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You will need to stir together 1 1/2 cups sugar, 1 1/2 cups rice flour, and 1 1/2 cups water.  Stir the ingredients together in a bowl until the flour is incorporated – it will be pretty watery.    Grease a microwave safe dish (I used an 8×8 pan) and cover with saran wrap.  For my old microwave I cook it for 6 minutes- I usually need to add an extra minute or two to package directions, so I would suggest starting with 5 minutes depending on the wattage of your microwave.Image

As soon as the microwave is done, carefully lift the plastic wrap off, watching for steam.  (I always burn myself.)  The “cake” will look set, but quite moist.

A somewhat related side story: I steam asparagus in the microwave in a similar manner, and once let it sit for 5 minutes while I finished cooking dinner.  When you steam in the microwave the plastic wrap puffs up, but as soon as the heat stops, the plastic wrap starts to cave in on the pan.  I don’t know all the science behind it, but my glass loaf pan shattered under the pressure.  So don’t leave the saran wrap on your mochi once its cooked.

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You want to knead the mochi while it is still warm.  I used a spoon to scoop it into my mixer.  After spending 3 minutes with the dough hook, it was well kneaded.

Mochi is traditionally rolled with potato starch on the outside – I just rubbed my hands in powdered sugar and found it was enough to keep the mochi from sticking. (Powder sugar is easy to find, and it just tastes better.)

You can fill your mochi – with nutella, coconut curd, sweet red beans, or whatever you like.  I was in too much of a hurry to figure out a neat way to fill them this time, but I think it will involve freezing balls of filling, and then wrapping the mochi around it.  Or possibly piping it in like you would with a jelly dough nut.

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I let my mochi sit out until it was completely cooled, and was no longer tacky to the touch before I covered it.  It has been sitting on the counter for four days, and the few remaining pieces are still good, but I have no idea of the shelf life.  I think I am going to try an ice cream filled version next time… 😀

Mochi

  • Servings: 20
  • Time: 30 minutes
  • Print

One of my favorite Japanese desserts is mochi. If I had to describe it, I guess I would call it a cross between a marshmallow and buttered rice – mildly sweet, slightly sticky, chewy, slight rice flavor, and delicious. I was very happy when I discovered how easy it is to make at home.

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups rice flour
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • powdered sugar, to roll
  • Stir sugar, rice flour, and water together in a bowl until the flour is incorporated – it will be pretty watery. Grease a microwave safe dish (I used an 8×8 pan) and cover with saran wrap. Microwave for 5-6 minutes (depending on your microwave’s wattage.)

    As soon as the microwave is done, carefully lift the plastic wrap off, watching for steam. The “cake” will look set, but quite moist.

    You want to knead the mochi while it is still warm. Use a spoon to scoop it into a mixer with the dough hook attachment. Mix until it is well kneaded – about 3 minutes with a kitchen aid.

    Coat your hands lightly with powdered sugar, and pinch off a ping pong ball sized piece of dough. Roll into a ball and set aside on waxed or parchment paper. Continue with remaining mochi, and allow to cool to room temperature before eating or covering.

    Makes 40-50 pieces of mochi.

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    8 Comments »

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    1. Yum! Can’t wait to try this and add in Nutella and maybe a little strawberry.

    2. Thankyou for this awesome foundation recipe. I am going to give it a go. Mocchi is exotica here in Tasmania Australia and very expensive to buy. I adore the stuff and since I moved here have had to give it up (for lent 😉 ) so now I am excited that I might be able to make it myself. Cheers for the chance and the great tutorial 🙂

      • So glad you can use it. I was super excited when I realized regular rice flour would work 🙂

        • Such a bonus as glutinous rice flour is a LOT more expensive. Cheers again 🙂

    3. These were delicious. 5 stars. Made for cooking tag game http://4foodfriendsandfun.yuku.com/topic/286/For-Your-ConsiderationTag-Game?page=1#.U81QkrFA6So

    4. These are so good, not overly sweet, which is why I really enjoyed these. I will be making these again for sure. Your instructions make this a perfect no-fail recipe!

      • So glad you enjoyed them! Thanks for taking the time to comment 🙂

    5. I was really excited when I put the batter together. In it’s liquid form, it already tasted just like mochi! However, I think I overcooked it in the microwave, as it turned out a bit moist, but more on the dry side. It did come together in the KitchenAid, but still a bit too dense for my liking. The flavor was spot on, though. I’ll give it another shot, and this time adjust for my microwave’s tendency to overcook. Practice makes perfect, right? Plus, will look for a red bean paste recipe to fill them with. Yum! Thanks for posting, Rachel! Made for Culinary Quest 2015 by a Toasted Tourist.


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