Recipe: Sourdough bread “from scratch”

March 17, 2011 at 4:00 am | Posted in Food | 2 Comments
Tags: , ,

There is something fun about making a loaf of bread from scratch, and actually being able to make a sandwich using it.  Sourdough bread isn’t difficult to make.   The starter has to sit on the counter for 10 days before you can use it, but you can make 5-6 loaves of bread from a single batch of starter, and it stores well in the freezer for months.

Sourdough Starter Recipe:

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 pack (2 1/14 tsp) yeast

Mix all ingredients in a glass bowl with a wood or plastic spoon.  (It is important that you don’t use a metal spoon or bowl since it will react to the ingredients.) Transfer to a gallon sized ziplock baggie. Mush the baggie once a day for a week, letting extra air out as the dough ferments and bubbles.

On the 7th day, add an additional cup of milk, flour, and sugar to feed the starter.  Continue mushing the bag for 4 more days.  On the 11th day, feed the starter with an additional cup of milk, flour, and sugar.

Divide into 1 cup portions.  Store in the freezer, use to make bread, pass on to a friend, or continue to feed once a week to keep your starter going.  (To defrost frozen starter, transfer to the refrigerator the day before you plan on using it, and move to the counter a few hours before use – although it can stay in the fridge for 2-3 days if needed.)

Sourdough Bread Recipe:

  • 1 cup sourdough starter
  • 1 cup warm water
  • sugar (see below)
  • 1 pack yeast (2 1/4 tsp)
  • dash salt
  • 3 tbsp melted butter
  • 3-4 cups flour
  • additional flour to knead
  • 2 tbsp butter

Pour warm water in a glass bowl. Sprinkle sugar* over water, stir to combine. Sprinkle yeast over sugar water. Let it sit undisturbed for 10-15 minutes, and allow it to bubble / froth.  This is called proofing the yeast.  If the yeast is bad, the mixture won’t bubble/froth.

*I use 1/2 cup of sugar.  I like everything sweet, even my sourdough bread.  If you prefer a stronger bread, you are fine using 1-2 tbsp of sugar.  You can also allow the starter to ferment up to 7 days after dividing for an even stronger sour flavor.

Add starter to the yeast mixture, with the salt and melted butter.  Its ok if the butter isn’t melted all the way.

Stir in 3 cups of flour. (I suppose you could use a mixer for this – its so simple to do by hand that I never have.) If your starter is very thin, you may need additional flour. The dough should be soft, but handleable.

Turn dough out onto a floured surface. Knead for 5 minutes or so.  If your bowl is large enough, you can knead the dough in it.  Sprinkle your bowl with flour, and let the dough rise in a warm place until doubled.  I turn my oven on for a few minutes to let it warm up a little, and then let the dough rise in there (where curious little fingers can’t poke.)  Depending on a lot of variables (the temperature, the humidity, your starter, your yeast, etc) it will take from 45 minutes up to 3 hours for your dough to double in size.  It is worth the wait.

When your dough is doubled, punch it down and knead it again.  Tuck it into a loaf pan (or two, depending on the size of your pan.)  Once again allow it to double in size to reach the top edge of your loaf pan.  The second rise should be quicker than the first rise.  (You technically don’t have to let it rise two times, but it makes for a much smoother bread with finer air bubbles if you do.)

(I forgot to take a photo of the bread when it was doubled in size.)  Remove your bread and preheat the oven to 375*F.    A pan of water placed in the oven will keep the crust softer.  Bake the bread for about 10 minutes, or until the crust has reached your desired color. Cover the loaf with a tinfoil tent (leave it a bit loose so that the bread can continue to rise.)

Bake an additional 45-60 minutes until the loaf is done.  The internal temperature should be 190-200, and it should sound hollow when thumped. I find it easier to just stick a thermometer in, than to remove the loaf of bread to thump the bottom.   Immediately brush the top with butter, to keep the crust moist.

Since there is butter on the top of the loaf, I find it easiest to replace the foil tent when I flip the bread out.  Then remove the foil after you have flipped the loaf onto your cutting board.  Ideally you should wait until the bread has completely cooled before slicing.  (Does anyone really have the self control for that?)  I slice my bread with an electric knife to get nice, even slices.  It is great if you want to wait and use it for sandwiches, but I can never resist a fresh slice of hot bread slathered with butter and honey.

Sourdough Starter

  • Servings: 3
  • Time: 7 days
  • Print

Sourdough Starter Recipe:

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 pack (2 1/14 tsp) yeast

Mix all ingredients in a glass bowl with a wood or plastic spoon.  (It is important that you don’t use a metal spoon or bowl since it will react to the ingredients.) Transfer to a gallon sized ziplock baggie. Mush the baggie once a day for a week, letting extra air out as the dough ferments and bubbles.

On the 7th day, add an additional cup of milk, flour, and sugar to feed the starter.  Continue mushing the bag for 4 more days.  On the 11th day, feed the starter with an additional cup of milk, flour, and sugar.

Divide into 1 cup portions.  Store in the freezer, use to make bread, pass on to a friend, or continue to feed once a week to keep your starter going.  (To defrost frozen starter, transfer to the refrigerator the day before you plan on using it, and move to the counter a few hours before use – although it can stay in the fridge for 2-3 days if needed.)

Printed from:  https://randomcreativity.wordpress.com/2011/03/17/recipe-sourdough-bread-from-scratch

Sourdough Bread

  • Servings: 2 loafs
  • Time: 1 day
  • Print

Sourdough Bread Recipe:

  • 1 cup sourdough starter
  • 1 cup warm water
  • sugar (1-2 tbsp for sour, up to 1/2 cup for super sweet)
  • 1 pack yeast (2 1/4 tsp)
  • dash salt
  • 3 tbsp melted butter
  • 3-4 cups flour
  • additional flour to knead
  • 2 tbsp butter
  1. Pour warm water in a glass bowl. Sprinkle sugar* over water, stir to combine. Sprinkle yeast over sugar water. Let it sit undisturbed for 10-15 minutes, and allow it to bubble / froth.  This is called proofing the yeast.  If the yeast is bad, the mixture won’t bubble/froth.
  2. Add starter to the yeast mixture, with the salt and melted butter.  Its ok if the butter isn’t melted all the way.
  3. Stir in 3 cups of flour. (I suppose you could use a mixer for this – its so simple to do by hand that I never have.) If your starter is very thin, you may need additional flour. The dough should be soft, but handleable.
  4. Turn dough out onto a floured surface. Knead for 5 minutes or so.  If your bowl is large enough, you can knead the dough in it.  Sprinkle your bowl with flour, and let the dough rise in a warm place until doubled.  Depending on a lot of variables (the temperature, the humidity, your starter, your yeast, etc) it will take from 45 minutes up to 3 hours for your dough to double in size.  It is worth the wait.
  5. When your dough is doubled, punch it down and knead it again.  Tuck it into a loaf pan (or two, depending on the size of your pan.)  Once again allow it to double in size to reach the top edge of your loaf pan.  The second rise should be quicker than the first rise.
  6. Preheat the oven to 375*F.    A pan of water placed in the oven will keep the crust softer.  Bake the bread for about 10 minutes, or until the crust has reached your desired color. Cover the loaf with a tinfoil tent (leave it a bit loose so that the bread can continue to rise.)
  7. Bake an additional 45-60 minutes until the loaf is done.  The internal temperature should be 190-200, and it should sound hollow when thumped. I find it easier to just stick a thermometer in, than to remove the loaf of bread to thump the bottom.   Immediately brush the top with butter, to keep the crust moist.
  8. Since there is butter on the top of the loaf, I find it easiest to replace the foil tent when I flip the bread out.  Then remove the foil after you have flipped the loaf onto your cutting board.  Ideally you should wait until the bread has completely cooled before slicing.  I slice my bread with an electric knife to get nice, even slices.  It is great if you want to wait and use it for sandwiches, but I can never resist a fresh slice of hot bread slathered with butter and honey.

Printed from:  https://randomcreativity.wordpress.com/2011/03/17/recipe-sourdough-bread-from-scratch

Advertisements

2 Comments »

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

  1. You make sourdough bread seem not very intimidating at all! I will have to give it a shot.

    • I hope you enjoy it! I added a printable recipe to the bottom of the post so it is easier to see all the steps at once 🙂


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

%d bloggers like this: